FREE SHIPPING IN THE USA ON ORDERS OF $75 OR MORE Free shipping on orders $75 or more in the U.S.

My Cart (0)

SIGN IN
SIGN IN
Call
+1 800 227 1428

Edward Hopper's New England Boxed Notecard Assortment

$17.95

Published with: The Whitney Museum of American Art

One of America’s best-loved painters, Edward Hopper has come to be recognized as one of the 20th century’s greatest realists. For most of his roughly 60-year career, Hopper divided his time between New York and New England. The four paintings featured in this notecard set capture the settings of harbor life, complete with bobbing dories, towering masts, village homes, and an all-important lighthouse. Contains five each of the following notecards: [Light at Two Lights], 1927 Gloucester Harbor, 1912 The Dories, Ogunquit, 1914 Tall Masts, 1912
• 20 blank notecards (5 each of 4 designs) with envelopes in a decorative box
• Printed in full color on recycled paper with soy based inks
• High-quality 250 gsm card stock
• Soft white envelopes
• Pomegranate’s notecard sets feature exclusive selections of art from museums and artists around the world

Published with The Whitney Museum of American Art

Box size: 5.375 x 7.375 x 1.5 in.
Card size: 5 x 7 in.

ISBN 9780764936913

Edward Hopper

Edward Hopper’s distinctive oil paintings convey subtle emotion sometimes construed as loneliness. Often, a single figure populates a scene, imparting a sense of silence. (Hopper himself did not talk much. A friend of his reported, “Hopper had no small talk; he was famous for his monumental silences.”) Still, Hopper (American, 1882–1967) maintained that his interest lay in capturing light rather than conveying a mood. Among his influences were the Ashcan School of gritty realism and Impressionism, whose use of outdoor light he admired. Hopper sold his first piece at the 1913 Armory Show. Ten years passed before he sold another, but in the following year, when he exhibited at a New York gallery, his work sold out and established his reputation. For most of his roughly 60-year career, Hopper divided his time between New York and New England. He is recognized as one of the 20th century’s greatest realists.
Reviews