FREE SHIPPING IN THE USA ON ORDERS OF $75 OR MORE FREE SHIPPING IN THE USA ON ORDERS OF $75 OR MORE

My Cart (0)

SIGN IN
SIGN IN
Call
+1 800 227 1428

Richard Diebenkorn: Beginnings, 1942–1955

$50.00

“The exhibition catalog, a lushly illustrated biography by the Sacramento museum’s chief curator, Scott A. Shields, is a document that should find an immediate place on the shelves of art history libraries everywhere.” —San Francisco Chronicle Audiences today generally know Richard Diebenkorn’s career in terms of three major evolutions: the periods of Abstract Expressionism, the figurative/representational period, and the Ocean Park and Healdsburg series of abstractions. Yet Diebenkorn’s earliest paintings and drawings remain little known. This catalogue, compiled to accompany a traveling exhibition of the same name, focuses on Diebenkorn’s evolution to maturity. It features nearly 200 paintings and drawings, many from the collection of the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation, that precede his shift to figuration. These early pieces evolved rapidly from representational landscape scenes and portraits of military colleagues, to semiabstract and Surrealist-inspired depictions of topography and the human form, to the artist's mature Abstract Expressionist paintings. Many of these pieces will be unfamiliar to the public, yet they offer a fuller picture of Diebenkorn’s precocious achievements and set the stage for what was yet to come. Audiences today generally know Richard Diebenkorn’s career in terms of three major evolutions: the Sausalito, Albuquerque, Urbana, and “early Berkeley” periods of Abstract Expressionism (1947–1955); the Berkeley figurative/representational period (1955–1966); and the Ocean Park (1967–1988) and Healdsburg (1988–1992) series of abstractions. Yet Diebenkorn’s earliest paintings and drawings remain little known. This catalogue, compiled to accompany a traveling exhibition of the same name, focuses on Diebenkorn’s evolution to maturity. It features nearly two hundred paintings and drawings, many from the collection of the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation, that precede his shift to figuration. These early pieces evolved rapidly from representational landscape scenes and portraits of military colleagues, to semiabstract and Surrealist-inspired depictions of topography and the human form, to the artist’s mature Abstract Expressionist paintings. Many of these pieces will be unfamiliar to the public, yet they offer a fuller picture of Diebenkorn’s precocious achievements and set the stage for what was yet to come. About the Author The Associate Director and Chief Curator at the Crocker Art Museum, Scott A. Shields holds an MA and PhD in art history from the University of Kansas. He has twenty years of museum experience in the Midwest and California. Having curated more than fifty exhibitions, he has been the primary or sole author of numerous exhibition catalogues, including Edgar Payne: The Scenic Journey (Pomegranate); Armin Hansen: The Artful Voyage (Pomegranate); and E. Charlton Fortune: The Colorful Spirit (Pomegranate).
Hardcover Smyth-sewn book, with jacket
240 pages with nearly 200 reproductions and photographs
Includes Foreword, Chronology, Selected Bibliography, Exhibition Checklist, and Index

• High-quality, premium stock matte art paper
• Exceptional color reproduction
• Printed with soy-based inks
• Sewn binding ensures long-lasting enjoyment

Size: 9.375 x 11 in.

ISBN 9780764979415

Richard Diebenkorn

Dynamic composition and strong color form a common thread in the diverse, career-spanning works of midcentury artist Richard Diebenkorn (American, 1922–1993)—one of the most influential American artists during the decades after World War II. His career encompassed three major artistic evolutions: the Sausalito, Albuquerque, Urbana, and early Berkeley periods of Abstract Expressionism (1947–1955); the Berkeley figurative/representational period (1955–1966); and the Ocean Park (1967–1988) and Healdsburg (1988–1992) series of abstractions. Born in Oregon, Diebenkorn spent much of his life in California. He is forever identified with the region’s qualities of light, particularly in his Ocean Park paintings (named for the neighborhood in Los Angeles). His years at the center of the Bay Area Figurative School connect his early and late periods. Diebenkorn died in Berkeley in 1993. A major posthumous retrospective opened at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1996. Since that time, exhibitions focusing on specific periods of Diebenkorn’s career have appeared in London and across the United States.
Reviews