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Edward Hopper: Portrait of Orleans 1000-Piece Jigsaw Puzzle

$20.95

Published with: the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco

Edward Hopper (American, 1882–1967) Portrait of Orleans, 1950 Edward Hopper’s distinctive oil paintings convey subtle emotion, often construed as loneliness. A single figure populates Portrait of Orleans, imparting a sense of silence to the nearly deserted scene. Still, Hopper repeatedly maintained that his interest lay in capturing light rather than conveying a mood. “I like long shadows and early and late sunlight. I am very much interested in light, and particularly sunlight, trying to paint sunlight without eliminating the form under it, if I can.” Hopper traveled throughout the United States for more than 40 years, recording everyday views of people and their surroundings.
• Gather with family and friends for puzzle-piecing together!
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• High-quality 250-GSM matte art paper for superior color, crisp details, and no glare
• Ribbon-cut thick board for snug fit and minimal dust
• Produced using thick recycled paper board
• Exclusive selection of art from museums and artists around the world

Published with the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco

Box size: 13 x 10 x 1.875 in.
Puzzle size: 29 x 20 in.

ISBN 9780764979750

Edward Hopper

Edward Hopper’s distinctive oil paintings convey subtle emotion sometimes construed as loneliness. Often, a single figure populates a scene, imparting a sense of silence. (Hopper himself did not talk much. A friend of his reported, “Hopper had no small talk; he was famous for his monumental silences.”) Still, Hopper (American, 1882–1967) maintained that his interest lay in capturing light rather than conveying a mood. Among his influences were the Ashcan School of gritty realism and Impressionism, whose use of outdoor light he admired. Hopper sold his first piece at the 1913 Armory Show. Ten years passed before he sold another, but in the following year, when he exhibited at a New York gallery, his work sold out and established his reputation. For most of his roughly 60-year career, Hopper divided his time between New York and New England. He is recognized as one of the 20th century’s greatest realists.
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