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Hudson River Valley School Boxed Notecards
Hudson River Valley School Boxed Notecards
Hudson River Valley School Boxed Notecards
Hudson River Valley School Boxed Notecards
Hudson River Valley School Boxed Notecards
Hudson River Valley School Boxed NotecardsHudson River Valley School Boxed NotecardsHudson River Valley School Boxed NotecardsHudson River Valley School Boxed NotecardsHudson River Valley School Boxed Notecards
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Hudson River Valley School Boxed Notecards

Item In Stock
Item #: 0664
Our Price: $15.95
Twenty assorted 5 x 7 in. blank notecards (5 each of 4 designs) with envelopes in a decorative box

Printed on recycled paper

ISBN 9780764986734
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Product Description
Hudson River Valley School Boxed Notecards
Thomas Cole (American, 1801–1848) wrote that the sky is “the soul of all scenery” and that “for variety and magnificence American skies are unsurpassed.” His reverence extended to the American landscape, and in 1825, after a sketching trip into New York’s Catskill wilderness, his depictions of the area launched the nation’s first native art movement. The Hudson River Valley school arose during a period of exploration, expansion, and a growing desire to preserve areas of unspoiled beauty. Artists such as Cole paid homage to the play of light on sky, water, and land as they infused their work with the sense of humankind’s smallness in the face of natural grandeur.

After Cole’s death, a second generation of Hudson River Valley school artists, including Cole’s former student Frederic Edwin Church (American, 1826–1900), as well as Jasper Francis Cropsey (American, 1823–1900) and Martin Johnson Heade (American, 1819–1904), carried on this American tradition.

Contains 5 each of the following images:
Martin Johnson Heade, Rhode Island Shore, 1858
Frederic Edwin Church, Tamaca Palms, 1854
Jasper Francis Cropsey, Autumn—On the Hudson River, 1860
Thomas Cole, View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm—The Oxbow, 1836