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The Space Within: Inside Great Chicago Buildings
The Space Within: Inside Great Chicago Buildings
The Space Within: Inside Great Chicago Buildings
The Space Within: Inside Great Chicago Buildings
The Space Within: Inside Great Chicago Buildings
The Space Within: Inside Great Chicago BuildingsThe Space Within: Inside Great Chicago BuildingsThe Space Within: Inside Great Chicago BuildingsThe Space Within: Inside Great Chicago BuildingsThe Space Within: Inside Great Chicago Buildings
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The Space Within: Inside Great Chicago Buildings

  • By
  • Patrick F. Cannon (author), James Caulfield (photographer)
Item In Stock
Item #: A242
Our Price: $65.00
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Hardcover Smyth-sewn casebound book, with jacket.

320 pages with more than 360 full-color photographs

Size: 11¾ x 9 in.

ISBN 9780764972058
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Product Description
The Space Within: Inside Great Chicago Buildings
“Dramatic exteriors, detailed interiors, and iconic images of ceilings, floors, staircases, windows, and interesting features are captured to perfection. . . . An exceptional virtual journey through time of Chicago’s longstanding cultural history, this title is highly recommended for all collections.” —Library Journal starred review


2016 Independent Publisher Book Awards Architecture category gold medal


For the first time, the interiors of some of the Chicago area’s greatest buildings, designed by celebrated architects, are brought together and featured in truly stunning original photographs. These Chicago-area homes, religious spaces, and commercial and public structures give visual meaning to Frank Lloyd Wright’s belief that “the space within becomes the reality of the building.”

Beginning with the Clarke House of 1836 and continuing to the present, every type and style of building is presented. Famous residences such as Wright’s Robie House and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House are here, but so are more modest (and not so modest) homes by Walter Burley Griffin, George Washington Maher, and Paul Schweikher. The ornate warmth of Adler & Sullivan’s Auditorium Building provides striking contrast to the modern, towering underground stacks of Helmut Jahn’s Mansueto Library. The soaring Bahá’í Temple by Louis Bourgeois is elegantly highlighted alongside a humble chapel in St. Procopius Abbey Church by Edward Dart. And commercial buildings by Daniel Burnham, John Wellborn Root, John Holabird, Martin Roche, and many more reaffirm Chicago’s position as a great business center. These architects and their contemporaries have made the Chicago area a mecca for both architects and lovers of architecture from around the world.

Text by author Patrick F. Cannon, who has lived and worked in Chicago and its suburbs for more than sixty years, discusses each building’s architecture, architect, and place in history. James Caulfield, a noted architectural photographer, leads a visual tour into both the intimate and grand interiors of the Chicago area’s finest buildings. The Space Within, the duo’s fifth book, demonstrates that good design comes in many styles. While many of these architectural masterpieces are open to the public, others—particularly the private homes—can be seen only here.

About the AUTHOR
Patrick F. Cannon has had a long career as a publicist, journalist, and editor. He is the author of Hometown Architect: The Complete Buildings of Frank Lloyd Wright in Oak Park and River Forest, Illinois; Prairie Metropolis: Chicago and the Birth of a New American Home; Frank Lloyd Wright’s Unity Temple: A Good Time Place; and Louis Sullivan: Creating a New American Architecture, all published by Pomegranate. He has also led tours of Chicago-area architecture for nearly forty years.

About the PHOTOGRAPHER
James Caulfield has been a commercial and advertising photographer for thirty years, working from his natural-light studio in downtown Chicago. He has donated more than five hundred images to the Society of Architectural Historians, as well as to the Glessner House and Clarke House museums, the Unity Temple Restoration Foundation, and the Richard Nickel Committee. He continues to work for the Frank Lloyd Wright Trust to document their sites, and for many years he photographed the buildings included on the famous Wright Plus house walks.
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